Welcome to UBC Recreation Tennis!

Our Mission: By offering comprehensive tennis programming from a professional staff we will strive to be leaders in the Lower Mainland public tennis community. We will provide the facility, instruction and service required for people of all ages and all levels of playing ability to improve their skills and enjoy their tennis experience.

We invite all Vancouver tennis players to come experience the UBC Tennis Centre – the only public tennis facility in Vancouver

 

For Our Hours of Operation, Please Click HERE!

 

Latest Tennis News

Want to receive more information about the UBC Tennis Centre or other facilities on campus? Our newsletter includes information about upcoming events, program information, tennis news around the world, and general tips and tricks to help you improve your game. Sign up to receive our UBC Recreation monthly newsletter HERE!

 

Josh’s Fresh Take: May Edition

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It is amazing how the fundamentals of tennis stick with us throughout our tennis career, but they are not skills that you actively think about during a match. As one of the tennis coaches at UBC, we stress the fundamentals to our students to help develop their game. Some of these fundamentals include the ever-important impact point, set-up, hitting zone, recovery, and the different grips for each stroke. To think about all the fundamentals at once is overwhelming when you are playing, but when your game is off and you are skanking balls off the court, it is beneficial to focus on a specific one.

I hit for the first time in weeks the other day and noticed I wasn’t quite getting what I wanted with my shots. Either they were just going out, or coming up short and hitting the net. Instead of just playing out the points with my opponent, I tried to focus on my set-up; getting my feet set and body sideways before the ball bounced on my side of the court. This meant that I could not be lazy, but instead had to be quicker in order to get set properly. By focusing on this, I could control more of my shots and place my opponent from side-to-side with less difficulty. It ultimately kept me in the game and I was able to win some points.

I am not necessarily saying that everyone needs to work on their set-up in a match. I just believe that it is beneficial to have a specific focus or goal during a match. The old quote “perfect practice makes perfect” comes to mind. Having something in particular to strive for will go a long way. Try it out, and if you are already doing this, try focusing on other fundamentals or skills next time you hit the courts.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

Josh’s Fresh Take: April Edition

Tennis: The Mental Battle

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It is no secret that tennis is a mental game. Perhaps one of the most out of any other sport. In a singles match, there is no one else to rely on but yourself; no teammates to support you, no one to take the blame for your mistakes… just you. This might be one of the most difficult aspects of the sport to overcome. As a tennis coach, I often see how this affects the young athletes that come up through our programs here at the UBC Tennis Centre. I notice how the pressure in a match to win a point or an audience watching from the sidelines can completely change the way someone performs. A serve that has, until now, been of second nature is suddenly being watched by other people. It is amazing how that serve can change so drastically once an athlete pays attention to every single detail: the toss, the impact, the constant thoughts running through their mind, or perhaps trying to impress someone in the audience. Of course, this is the case for any sport, but I believe it is much more heightened with tennis as you are the lone soldier facing off against another lone soldier. A mental battle.

Recently, I was coaching teen fundamentals during our Spring Break Camps along with fellow co-worker Bob Exell, who is not only an incredible tennis coach but an incredible player as well. As we were heading off court, one of the students approached Bob with frustration. She was concerned with how to control her emotions while playing in a match, as she would get frustrated and angry when she made a mistake. Bob calmly mentioned that it is important to stay positive and that it is incredibly easy to let mistakes and negativity spiral your game out of control. He then said something that I will never forget. He said, with a chuckle I might add, “one more thing, as you’re walking away tell yourself, ‘I am in control’, and take a deep breath.”

Like I mentioned earlier, tennis is a mental game and it is important to learn from your mistakes. But I think it’s almost more important to not let those mistakes get to you; learn from them and move on. Re-assure yourself with positive thoughts, especially in the middle of a match. And like Bob, use a simple phrase to remind yourself that you are in control. It will go a long way.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

NEW Adult Fitness Workshops!

To build a strong and balanced body that performs well, you must first begin with a strong and balanced foundation. Train what matters if you want to do what you love. These workshops are for anyone who is looking to correct and integrate their body’s neuromuscular patterns to avoid injury and improve performance. The classes are run by Carla Cupido, a certified chiropractor looking to help you build a truly balanced body. A yoga mat is required, however there will be mats available to rent. Check out our Adult Spring/Summer Programs page for more details on the two upcoming sessions.

Download your 2017 UBC Summer Camps Guide

All kids should experience the positive benefits of recreation and the opportunity to build confidence, social, and life skills through our tailored camps programming. View our Camps Guide for everything you need to know about the programs we offer.

View the 2017 UBC Summer Camps Guide for all the information you need to know to get moving.

2017 Spring Summer Guides Now Available

UBC Recreation is here to get our community moving. We’re proud to offer a variety of programs and activities for everyone of all ages and skill levels. From first time swim lessons for 6-month olds to intramural league sports and Seniors Tennis, and everything in between.

View the 2017 Spring Summer Guide for all the information you need to know to get moving.

Our Sport Facilities are hiring!

Looking for something to do this summer? Look no further than the south side of campus!

We’re still looking for a couple of quality students to join our Facility Operations student staff teams at the following facilities:

  • UBC Baseball Indoor Training Centre
  • Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre
  • UBC Tennis Centre

To apply, log in on Careers Online and search for jobs under ‘Athletics and Recreation.’

Applications are open throughout April! 

U14 Indoor Rogers Junior Nationals

We are very excited to be hosting the Under 14 Indoor Rogers Junior Nationals from April 2nd-8th! Stop by the Centre to witness the amazing talent from all over the country. For more information about the tournament please visit the tournament website.

Please note that during this week, the availability at the Centre for public bookings will be limited. We will do our best to accommodate all booking requests, but with the limited availability there is no guarantee that a court will be available for all requests.

Josh’s Fresh Take: March Edition

Can Other Sports Make You a Better Overall Tennis Player ?

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

From coaching athletes for the past two years ranging in age from 3 to 70, one of the biggest realizations I’ve had is how playing other sports, besides tennis, dramatically improve your game. Time and time again there have been beginner tennis players that sign up for tennis, pick up a racket, and by the end of the first lesson are rallying consistently over the net. This is regardless of the program or their age. Red, orange, green, youth, teen, and our adult clinics; I’ve seen it in all of these levels. These players often have an “athletic look” or generally seem like athletes. Recently I started asking questions, “how can this be? This player has barely touched a racket, how are they so quick to pick up this technically-difficult sport?”.

I asked nearly everyone that surprised me in terms of expectations for a beginner. I found that these specific players have played, or are currently playing, other sports such as hockey, soccer, basketball, volleyball, badminton, etc. These sports all develop athletes in their individual ways and generally help with coordination as well as an active body. They also prepare players to constantly be ready to react to a quick movement whether it’s taking a wrist shot in hockey, hitting a home run in baseball, or fast footwork in soccer. These aspects directly translate to the tennis courts as these players are coming in with a high level of hand-eye coordination and sense of their surroundings and body. This makes learning the game of tennis incredibly easier than it would if they never played another sport.

Personally, as a hockey and tennis player I’ve seen some direct translations between the two sports in a fascinating way. I play with a left-handed hockey stick and in tennis I hit a backhand with both of my hands on the left side (as I would for hockey). I’ve always found that my backhand in tennis had a lot more control and power than my forehand and never really thought about the reasoning. This was until I started noticing the same in some of the students I coach, whom after asking all had the same background: hockey. Because of the countless hours of handling a puck, passing, and shooting using both hands in another sport, you ultimately develop more control and strength on that side which translates over to the backhand in tennis.

So for all you beginners out there that are interested in playing tennis, remember that you can improve your tennis game by not only playing tennis! There are many other skills that translate over to the game that will only make you better. Juggle a soccer ball in your spare time, run sprints at the track, shoot pucks at a net, get out there… and make sure you always stay fresh.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

 

Ps. If you have any personal experience of playing other sports that translate over to the game of tennis, email us your stories! We would love to hear from you.

May 11, 2017

Josh’s Fresh Take: May Edition

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It is amazing how the fundamentals of tennis stick with us throughout our tennis career, but they are not skills that you actively think about during a match. As one of the tennis coaches at UBC, we stress the fundamentals to our students to help develop their game. Some of these fundamentals include the ever-important impact point, set-up, hitting zone, recovery, and the different grips for each stroke. To think about all the fundamentals at once is overwhelming when you are playing, but when your game is off and you are skanking balls off the court, it is beneficial to focus on a specific one.

I hit for the first time in weeks the other day and noticed I wasn’t quite getting what I wanted with my shots. Either they were just going out, or coming up short and hitting the net. Instead of just playing out the points with my opponent, I tried to focus on my set-up; getting my feet set and body sideways before the ball bounced on my side of the court. This meant that I could not be lazy, but instead had to be quicker in order to get set properly. By focusing on this, I could control more of my shots and place my opponent from side-to-side with less difficulty. It ultimately kept me in the game and I was able to win some points.

I am not necessarily saying that everyone needs to work on their set-up in a match. I just believe that it is beneficial to have a specific focus or goal during a match. The old quote “perfect practice makes perfect” comes to mind. Having something in particular to strive for will go a long way. Try it out, and if you are already doing this, try focusing on other fundamentals or skills next time you hit the courts.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

April 13, 2017

Josh’s Fresh Take: April Edition

Tennis: The Mental Battle

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It is no secret that tennis is a mental game. Perhaps one of the most out of any other sport. In a singles match, there is no one else to rely on but yourself; no teammates to support you, no one to take the blame for your mistakes… just you. This might be one of the most difficult aspects of the sport to overcome. As a tennis coach, I often see how this affects the young athletes that come up through our programs here at the UBC Tennis Centre. I notice how the pressure in a match to win a point or an audience watching from the sidelines can completely change the way someone performs. A serve that has, until now, been of second nature is suddenly being watched by other people. It is amazing how that serve can change so drastically once an athlete pays attention to every single detail: the toss, the impact, the constant thoughts running through their mind, or perhaps trying to impress someone in the audience. Of course, this is the case for any sport, but I believe it is much more heightened with tennis as you are the lone soldier facing off against another lone soldier. A mental battle.

Recently, I was coaching teen fundamentals during our Spring Break Camps along with fellow co-worker Bob Exell, who is not only an incredible tennis coach but an incredible player as well. As we were heading off court, one of the students approached Bob with frustration. She was concerned with how to control her emotions while playing in a match, as she would get frustrated and angry when she made a mistake. Bob calmly mentioned that it is important to stay positive and that it is incredibly easy to let mistakes and negativity spiral your game out of control. He then said something that I will never forget. He said, with a chuckle I might add, “one more thing, as you’re walking away tell yourself, ‘I am in control’, and take a deep breath.”

Like I mentioned earlier, tennis is a mental game and it is important to learn from your mistakes. But I think it’s almost more important to not let those mistakes get to you; learn from them and move on. Re-assure yourself with positive thoughts, especially in the middle of a match. And like Bob, use a simple phrase to remind yourself that you are in control. It will go a long way.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

April 12, 2017

NEW Adult Fitness Workshops!

To build a strong and balanced body that performs well, you must first begin with a strong and balanced foundation. Train what matters if you want to do what you love. These workshops are for anyone who is looking to correct and integrate their body’s neuromuscular patterns to avoid injury and improve performance. The classes are run by Carla Cupido, a certified chiropractor looking to help you build a truly balanced body. A yoga mat is required, however there will be mats available to rent. Check out our Adult Spring/Summer Programs page for more details on the two upcoming sessions.

April 10, 2017

Download your 2017 UBC Summer Camps Guide

All kids should experience the positive benefits of recreation and the opportunity to build confidence, social, and life skills through our tailored camps programming. View our Camps Guide for everything you need to know about the programs we offer.

View the 2017 UBC Summer Camps Guide for all the information you need to know to get moving.