Welcome to UBC Recreation Tennis!

Our Mission: By offering comprehensive tennis programming from a professional staff we will strive to be leaders in the Lower Mainland public tennis community. We will provide the facility, instruction and service required for people of all ages and all levels of playing ability to improve their skills and enjoy their tennis experience.

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Latest Tennis News

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Josh’s Fresh Take: July Edition

Superstitious Habits? Do They Really Work?

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It’s funny how superstitions formulate for an individual. A form of eccentric routine that helps an athlete perform or rather gives them the confidence to perform at their best. Rafael Nadal is a walking example of superstitious habits. His famous tucking his hair behind his ears right before a big serve or that he needs two water bottles, one warm and one cold, during a match. In addition he also jumps non-stop during every pre-game coin toss and, my personal favourite, how he will not stand up from his chair until his opponent stands.

This past week, I had the chance to talk with fellow UBC Tennis Centre Coach, Dana Radivojevic, about some of her superstitious habits on and off the court. Some of which, like Nada, help Dana focus against her opponent and calm her nerves.

“What I used to do during my matches, specifically when it was time to pick up a ball for serving, was I would pick it up with my left foot and my racket. Once I did that, I would bounce the ball all the way back to the baseline about 5 to 10 times depending on how nervous I was. Once at the baseline, I would bounce the ball three times with my left hand and then I would serve. This was just a way that would help me focus and relax.”

This is the most interesting part of superstitious habits. They become part of a routine where individuals carry them out to focus and relax, just like Dana said. But are there other reasons as to why people carry out these habits? Can it be a form of OCD? Another habit of Nadal’s is the fact that he needs his water bottles diagonally placed facing the court with the labels pointed towards his side of the court. Is that really going to help his performance against the likes of Roger Federer? The angle of his water bottle label? In short, most likely. If this is part of Nadal’s routine and the labels were not facing the appropriate direction, it could serve as a distraction. Nadal’s focus would be taken away from the game until this was corrected.

It is fascinating really that there is so much going on inside an athlete’s head that one small superstitious habit not carried out could throw them off completely. In Dana’s case, she makes sure not to eat a lot of sugar when preparing for a match because of a previous experience.

“One time I had Nutella before a match and it completely threw me off. I played terribly. From that one experience, I created a routine to eat healthier instead, like eating eggs, or whole foods and nothing processed.

Did the Nutella that Dana had before that match really effect her performance that greatly? Perhaps, or perhaps not. At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter. What matters is that Dana gets reassurance from cutting out sugar before a big match. Reassurance that a poor performance is unlikely to repeat. And that, my friends, gives confidence which is a huge aspect of any sport, especially in tennis.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

Summer Heat Tennis

Beat the heat this summer at our Summer Heat Tennis sessions running every Tuesday starting July 11th. Each session will run from 7-9pm and will be hosted by a UBC Tennis Coach. Come and enjoy a variety of singles and doubles match-play.

Adult Tennis Summer Camps

Our summer camps are not only available for youth! During July and August we will be running our adult camps for levels 1.0-2.0, 2.5-3.0 and 3.5-4.0. Each weekly camp runs Monday (occasionally Tuesday) through Friday and only 1.5 hours each day. These camps are jam packed with drills and activities to start your day and will be hosted on our outdoor court. Our condensed camp program will help develop your skills at an advanced rate. Join us this summer for some fun in the sun!

Tennis Workshops

Looking to improve on a specific skill? Our one-stop-one-shot workshops are great for those looking to improve on their serve, return of serve, or offensive play, just to name a few. Each workshop has a specific area of focus and run every Thursday from 11:00am-12:00pm before our summer programs begin in July. We look forward to seeing you there!

Adult and Youth Summer Camps!

We proudly provide Youth and Adult summer camps for all ages! Adult camps are available for all levels between 1.0-4.0 and various youth camps are available for children ages 3-18. Our week-long camps will start on July 4th and run until September 1st. Be sure to secure your spot as the camps fill up quickly!

Josh’s Fresh Take: June Edition

High Performance Director, Sasha Boskovic, Weighs In

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

Our new High Performance Director, Sasha Boskovic, has infused a surge of energy and life in to our High Performance programs with his high-demand and energetic coaching style. His voice can often be heard from 3-4 courts away and he always gets the most out of his athletes. On behalf of the Tennis Centre, it is a pleasure to have Sasha join our team as we look forward to the future. With that said, I had an opportunity to sit down with the man of the hour and discuss his passion for the sport as well as some nutritional advice that he wanted to share from his own past experiences.

Interestingly enough, Sasha brought to light his superstitious habits on match day as well as his ritual for the night before a match.

“I would have one full cup of Gatorade before every match. Once I was on court I would alternate between a full cup of water and a full cup of Gatorade to stay hydrated. I was very superstitious when I played. I would always have bananas throughout a match to keep my energy up. The night before, I would make sure to carb load with a lot of pasta and meat sauce to have energy for the next day. And before my matches I would eat a bit lighter with granola bars to try to get any kind of vitamins up.”

After speaking with Sasha, it was intriguing to hear about his superstitious habits as I am sure other coaches or athletes have some interesting habits of their own. It is known that Olympic runner, Usain Bolt, insists on eating chicken nuggets before every race. This is something that many dieticians would raise their eyebrows at, but hey, if it works then who is to say it is wrong? On that note, I’ll make sure to ask some other coaches here at the UBC Tennis Centre about their superstitious routines and include it in next month’s Fresh Take.

Here are some departing words from our new High Performance Director on why he loves coaching the game of tennis:

“When a kid I am coaching wins, it brings me more joy than when I used to win. Just seeing them succeed after the hard work that they put in and seeing the joy on their faces makes it all worthwhile for me.”

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

French Open Soiree

If you missed our last Mixer in April, do not worry as the next UBC Tennis Centre Social Mixer is on June 9th! Come and enjoy an evening of doubles match play, food, drinks, and good company. Prizes will be awarded throughout the evening and you won’t want to miss your chance to play with some of our coaches. We hope to see you then!

Josh’s Fresh Take: May Edition

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It is amazing how the fundamentals of tennis stick with us throughout our tennis career, but they are not skills that you actively think about during a match. As one of the tennis coaches at UBC, we stress the fundamentals to our students to help develop their game. Some of these fundamentals include the ever-important impact point, set-up, hitting zone, recovery, and the different grips for each stroke. To think about all the fundamentals at once is overwhelming when you are playing, but when your game is off and you are skanking balls off the court, it is beneficial to focus on a specific one.

I hit for the first time in weeks the other day and noticed I wasn’t quite getting what I wanted with my shots. Either they were just going out, or coming up short and hitting the net. Instead of just playing out the points with my opponent, I tried to focus on my set-up; getting my feet set and body sideways before the ball bounced on my side of the court. This meant that I could not be lazy, but instead had to be quicker in order to get set properly. By focusing on this, I could control more of my shots and place my opponent from side-to-side with less difficulty. It ultimately kept me in the game and I was able to win some points.

I am not necessarily saying that everyone needs to work on their set-up in a match. I just believe that it is beneficial to have a specific focus or goal during a match. The old quote “perfect practice makes perfect” comes to mind. Having something in particular to strive for will go a long way. Try it out, and if you are already doing this, try focusing on other fundamentals or skills next time you hit the courts.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

July 11, 2017

Josh’s Fresh Take: July Edition

Superstitious Habits? Do They Really Work?

Coach and Communications Lead, Josh Martin, weighs in on topics in the world of tennis and shares his two cents.

It’s funny how superstitions formulate for an individual. A form of eccentric routine that helps an athlete perform or rather gives them the confidence to perform at their best. Rafael Nadal is a walking example of superstitious habits. His famous tucking his hair behind his ears right before a big serve or that he needs two water bottles, one warm and one cold, during a match. In addition he also jumps non-stop during every pre-game coin toss and, my personal favourite, how he will not stand up from his chair until his opponent stands.

This past week, I had the chance to talk with fellow UBC Tennis Centre Coach, Dana Radivojevic, about some of her superstitious habits on and off the court. Some of which, like Nada, help Dana focus against her opponent and calm her nerves.

“What I used to do during my matches, specifically when it was time to pick up a ball for serving, was I would pick it up with my left foot and my racket. Once I did that, I would bounce the ball all the way back to the baseline about 5 to 10 times depending on how nervous I was. Once at the baseline, I would bounce the ball three times with my left hand and then I would serve. This was just a way that would help me focus and relax.”

This is the most interesting part of superstitious habits. They become part of a routine where individuals carry them out to focus and relax, just like Dana said. But are there other reasons as to why people carry out these habits? Can it be a form of OCD? Another habit of Nadal’s is the fact that he needs his water bottles diagonally placed facing the court with the labels pointed towards his side of the court. Is that really going to help his performance against the likes of Roger Federer? The angle of his water bottle label? In short, most likely. If this is part of Nadal’s routine and the labels were not facing the appropriate direction, it could serve as a distraction. Nadal’s focus would be taken away from the game until this was corrected.

It is fascinating really that there is so much going on inside an athlete’s head that one small superstitious habit not carried out could throw them off completely. In Dana’s case, she makes sure not to eat a lot of sugar when preparing for a match because of a previous experience.

“One time I had Nutella before a match and it completely threw me off. I played terribly. From that one experience, I created a routine to eat healthier instead, like eating eggs, or whole foods and nothing processed.

Did the Nutella that Dana had before that match really effect her performance that greatly? Perhaps, or perhaps not. At the end of the day, it doesn’t really matter. What matters is that Dana gets reassurance from cutting out sugar before a big match. Reassurance that a poor performance is unlikely to repeat. And that, my friends, gives confidence which is a huge aspect of any sport, especially in tennis.

Josh’s Fresh Take, signing off.

July 5, 2017

Summer Heat Tennis

Beat the heat this summer at our Summer Heat Tennis sessions running every Tuesday starting July 11th. Each session will run from 7-9pm and will be hosted by a UBC Tennis Coach. Come and enjoy a variety of singles and doubles match-play.

June 19, 2017

Adult Tennis Summer Camps

Our summer camps are not only available for youth! During July and August we will be running our adult camps for levels 1.0-2.0, 2.5-3.0 and 3.5-4.0. Each weekly camp runs Monday (occasionally Tuesday) through Friday and only 1.5 hours each day. These camps are jam packed with drills and activities to start your day and will be hosted on our outdoor court. Our condensed camp program will help develop your skills at an advanced rate. Join us this summer for some fun in the sun!

June 14, 2017

Tennis Workshops

Looking to improve on a specific skill? Our one-stop-one-shot workshops are great for those looking to improve on their serve, return of serve, or offensive play, just to name a few. Each workshop has a specific area of focus and run every Thursday from 11:00am-12:00pm before our summer programs begin in July. We look forward to seeing you there!